August 29, 2012

Review: The Lovesick Cure by Pamela Morsi


Source: we received an e-ARC of the book through NetGalley for review purposes.

I’ve heard good things about Ms. Morsi’s books, so when I saw this book available to review I requested it. The story is a balanced mixed between Women’s Fiction and Contemporary Romance, but I didn’t live up to my expectations. 

When Jesse’s fiancĂ© marries someone else, she quits her job and moves to her aunt’s isolated town in the Ozarks. She does it to lick her wounds and to get a change of pace. Her aunt is almost a local celebrity. She makes different potions and gives advice, like a spiritual leader. But she’s old and tired, so they take care of each other. One of the potions aunt Will makes, it’s called the lovesick cure, and once she starts the treatment it sets a series of events that will help her realize what makes her happy, and even find love with aunt Will’s doctor.

I’m having a hard time writing this review because the book was average. Not bad but bland and mostly forgettable. I think the one reason I’ll remember it is because it has a ginger hero. All the characters were likeable, the romance was sweet and the conflict almost nonexistent. So I guess a good word to describe it would be bland. I didn’t dislike it, but it didn’t elicit any emotion either.

The book’s emphasis is on Jesse’s relationship with aunt Will. There’s a predictable big revelation, the heroine goes through her self-discovery journey without experiencing much angst, and a couple of secondary characters have to make a couple of life-changing decisions. The ingredients are there, but I felt like it was missing emotion. This wasn’t a compelling story. 

I liked Ms. Morsi’s voice. I also loved the setting -- I think the Ozarks is an interesting place that gives a unique and isolated feel to the average small town romance. The hero, Piney, was mature and levelheaded. He worked as a romantic lead and fit the story well. The romance wasn’t the main focus but I liked it. But overall it just failed to engage me.

Fans of the author would like to read it and it’s a story that I think those who enjoy Robyn Carr’s books will like it. But it wasn’t for me and I won’t recommend it to you, especially if you’re weary of Women’s Fiction and small-town stories.

Review by Brie
Grade: 3
Sensuality: McSexy
Purchase: Amazon

Synopsis:

For Jesse Winsloe, the answer is clear: head into hiding. Single again and laid off from work, Jesse flees to Onery Cabin to lick her wounds with her ancient aunt Will—a Granny woman with the secret to healing the lovelorn. 
Sure, Onery Cabin may be right out of Hollywood's Lifestyles of the Poor and Hillbilly, but Marrying Stone Mountain has its charm—including the local physician's assistant, Piney Baxley, a past recipient of Aunt Will's pungent "heartbreak poultice." 
Between folk remedies and a "no strings attached" romance, Jesse is beginning to think she's found her own brand of lovesick cure—because there's nothing like a pinch of confidence and a dash of attraction to mend a broken heart.

Harlequin MIRA. August 28, 2012.

7 comments:

  1. See, I don't really like hybrid genres books. I'd rather the author chooses contemporary romance or women's fiction.

    I also feel Ms Morsi had more success with her older books... but that's just me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't read her older books, should I try one?

      Delete
    2. I don't know, I only read one that was historical, but american historical. Not bad. She's not an author that I gravitate towards.

      Delete
  2. I have this book, and I will read it as I like her books...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Kathleen!

      I hope you enjoy, maybe since you're a fan and know what to expect you will like it better than I did. Let me know!

      Delete
  3. Aw that kind of sucks. I like books that I can get passionate about, or some other strong emotion. A book that's neither here not there is not gonna be on my radar. Thanks for the heads up. Sorry it didn't work for you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I think the books that fall in the middle are the worst ones, because they are more difficult to quit but leave you feeling nothing much.

      Delete

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The books reviewed here were purchased by us. If the book was provided by the author or publisher for review, it will be noted on the post. We do not get any type of monetary compensation from publishers or authors.